amazon.com
Advertisement

Classics Du Jour
Always classic rock

Rolling Stones Voodoo Lounge Uncut
Advertisement

Sgt. Pepper by the Numbers

You’ve seen it a million times, but we bet even most die-hard Beatles fans can’t identify everyone on the iconic Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover. So we’ve made it easy for you…  Good luck in your next Beatles trivia game!

Use the left/right arrows to navigate your way through all the characters on the cover.

Sgt. Pepper album cover by the numbers

01 Sri Yukteswar Giri

George Harrison was quite interested in Indian philosophy and helped place four prominent yogis on the cover. Sri Yukteswar Giri wrote the book The Holy Science and was the guru to both Sri Mahavatara Babaji (#27) and Paramahansa Yogananda (#33). Sri Lahiri Mahasaya (#51) was a disciple of Sri Mahavatara Babaji (#27).

02 Aleister Crowley

Crowley is mainly known as an author who promoted occultism. Associated more with Led Zeppelin than the Beatles, his motto of "Do What Thou Wilt" inspired many English musicians of the day, including David Bowie and Ozzy Osbourne.

03 Mae West

Mae West, Hollywood icon and bombshell, at first turned down the Beatles’ request to be on the album cover, but eventually relented after a personal letter to her from the band. Ringo Starr later appeared in her final movie Sextette

04 Lenny Bruce

Counterculture hero and comedian Lenny Bruce was a favorite of the Beatles and was even signed to their experimental label Zapple, although his comedy album was never released.

05 Karlheinz Stockhausen

Groundbreaking German composer Stockhausen was a visionary who pioneered the use of electronic music and was introduced to the Beatles through Paul McCartney.

06 W.C. Fields

The Beatles admired Fields’ brand of vaudeville comedy and it’s said he influenced songs like “Your Mother Should Know” on Magical Mystery Tour.

07 Carl Jung

Jung was on the original list submitted by George, Paul and John of their choices for the album cover. Psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Jung initiated the concept of “persona” (his word for the version of ourselves that we choose to present to the public) which the Beatles were struggling with at the time.

08 Edgar Allan Poe

Poe is of course one of the world’s greatest poets and writers. He was also mentioned in “I Am The Walrus”:

Semolina Pilchard
Climbing up the Eiffel tower
Elementary penguin singing Hare Krishna
Man, you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allen Poe

09 Fred Astaire

Legendary dancer and performer Astaire was said to be thrilled to be asked to appear on the album cover. He remained a favorite of the band, appearing with John and Yoko in the 1972 television film Imagine and inspiring McCartney in 2012 who said he was "channelling Fred Astaire” on his new album of covers.

10 Richard Merkin

Merkin was a well known painter and illustrator who was fascinated with the 1920s and 1930s early jazz period. Described as a “dandy,” he was known to wear his trademark scarf and ballet slippers around the campus of the Rhode Island School of Design where he taught for over 40 years.

11 A Vargas Girl

This image comes from Peruvian painter Joaquin Alberto Vargas y Chávez who created “pin-up” paintings known as the Varga Girls. These images appeared on World War II fighter jets and later became staples in decades of issues of Playboy magazine.

12 Leo Gorcey

Leo Gorcey was an actor who famously portrayed a young hooligan in a TV gang called the Dead End Kids, The East Side Kids, and then The Bowery Boys, throughout the 1940s and 1950s, alongside actor Huntz Hall. Notice the blank space where his head is supposed to be? He had refused to let The Beatles use his image unless they paid him a fee, so instead of paying him, they painted him out of the cover.

13 Huntz Hall

Hall starred as buffoon Horace DeBussy "Sach" Jones in 48 Bowery Boys films. He did not ask for a fee to be included on the album cover, so we see his picture.

14 Simon Rodia

Rodia created the Los Angeles landmark The Watts Towers. The project took Rodia 33 years to complete.

15 Bob Dylan

Dylan was a friend and influence to the Beatles throughout their career. They helped him “go electric” in 1965 and he helped them rethink the crafting of their songs. Eventually, George Harrison and Dylan formed The Traveling Wilburys.

16 Aubrey Beardsley

A leading figure in the Aesthetic movement along with Oscar Wilde and James Whistler, Beardsley died of tuberculosis in 1898 at the young age of 25. His artwork influenced Klaus Voormann’s cover for Revolver.

17 Sir Robert Peel

Sir Robert Peel was the Prime Minister of the UK from 1834-35 and 1841-46. His name is still referenced today, with the terms “bobbies” and “peelers” referring to policemen in England and Ireland, respectively.

18 Aldous Huxley

Huxley was a celebrated author who wrote around 50 novels, including Brave New World and The Doors of Perception, which gave The Doors their name. He experimented with psychedelic drugs and later become one of Hollywood’s highest paid screenwriters.

19 Dylan Thomas

Supposedly, John Lennon started writing because of Welsh poet Dylan Thomas, although all of the Beatles were fans of his work.

20 Terry Southern

Terry Southern was a novelist who notedly used satire in his works, which included Dr. Strangelove, The Cincinnati Kid and Easy Rider. He later also wrote for Saturday Night Live.

21 Dion DiMucci

DiMucci was the leader of Dion And The Belmonts and singer of the hits “The Wanderer” and “Runaround Sue”– which influenced the early works of The Beatles.

22 Tony Curtis

Idol and actor Tony Curtis was a Hollywood idol that The Beatles revered. Paul told Curtis, “…when they were kids, they wanted to come up with a different kind of hairstyle, and my name was mentioned as someone who wore hair more like clothing.”

23 Wallace Berman

Artist Wallace Berman made collages including poetry, drawings, photocopies and other images that he mixed with acrylic paint. He was good friends with Dennis Hopper and had a small part in Easy Rider.

24 Tommy Handley

Tommy Handley was a comedian born in Liverpool, so he was a local hero for The Beatles. He had also had a popular decade-long BBC radio show, ITMA (“It’s That Man Again”).

25 Marilyn Monroe

Fun fact: Sgt. Pepper was officially released on what would have been Monroe’s 41st birthday, June 1, 1967. There may be no more iconic sex symbol image than that of Monroe.

26 William Burroughs

A major part of the Beat Generation, Burroughs was the author of Naked Lunch. According to Burroughs, he watched Paul McCartney work on “Eleanor Rigby.” “I saw the song taking shape. Once again, not knowing much about music, I could see that he knew what he was doing.”

27 Sri Mahavatara Babaji

Babaji was an Indian yogi. (See #1)

28 Stan Laurel

Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy (#30) are another set of comedians that the Beatles revered. Sadly they both passed away prior to the release of Sgt. Pepper.

29 Richard Lindner

Lindner was a painter who was known, according to the New York Times, “…for his portrayals of fascinating and ferocious women. In painting after painting, he gave new meaning to the words ‘femme fatale’”.

30 Oliver Hardy

See #28.

31 Karl Marx

Karl Marx, best known for his 1848 pamphlet The Communist Manifesto, was a German philosopher, economist, historian, political theorist, sociologist, journalist and socialist revolutionary. He has been described as one of the most influential figures in human history.

32 H.G. Wells

Wells is known as “the father of science fiction,” writing famous works like The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds.

33 Sri Paramahansa Yogananda

Indian yogi. (See #1)

34 Hairdresser wax dummy #1

Two wax dummies were borrowed from a local hair shop. This one has a striped red-and-yellow hat, while its counterpart (#36) wears a green bonnet.

35 Stuart Sutcliffe

Sutcliffe was The Beatles’ original bassist, but famously left the group to enroll in the Hamburg College Of Art. He is credited with naming the band “The Beetles” with John Lennon, who later changed the spelling to “Beatles” since it contained the word “beat.” Sadly, Sutcliffe died in 1962 from a brain aneurysm. He was only 21.

36 Hairdresser wax dummy #2

See #34.

37 Max Miller

Max Miller was known as "The Cheeky Chappie,” and was widely regarded as the greatest stand-up comedian in the 1920s and 30s.

38 Petty Girl #1

Similar to the Vargas Girls (#11), Petty Girls were pin-up paintings done by artist George Petty that appeared in Esquire between 1933 and 1956. Copies of his paintings were famously featured on the nose of the B-17 fighter jet nicknamed Memphis Belle.

39 Marlon Brando

One of the greatest actors of all time, the Beatles would have been influenced by Brando’s role of Johnny Strabler in the 1953 movie, The Wild One. In it, Brando was the leader of a motorcycle gang.

40 Tom Mix

Tom Mix starred in 291 movies, and was Hollywood’s "King of Cowboys,” influencing Ronald Reagan and John Wayne when they were young. Mix was a cowboy in real life too, living on a ranch, performing in circuses and winning rodeo awards.

41 Oscar Wilde

Novelist Oscar Wilde is probably best remembered The Picture Of Dorian Gray. He was also a poet and playwright, who was later imprisoned for “gross indecency,” which was a term used for homosexual behavior.

42 Tyrone Power

Power was a matinee idol in the 1930s and 40s, and later received his biggest accolades for his live theater work. He was the lead swashbuckling character in The Mark Of Zorro.

43 Larry Bell

Bell, an American sculptor and artist, is one of the few people who is still alive depicted on this album cover. He first became famous in his early 20’s by constructing“shadowboxes,” which then evolved into his cube sculptures.

44 David Livingstone

Livingstone was a famous missionary and scientific explorer who was one of the first Westerners to make a transcontinental journey across Africa. When Henry Morton Stanley found Livingstone in what is now known as Tanzania after he had been missing for six years, he uttered the now-famous line, “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

45 Johnny Weissmuller

Johnny Weissmuller won five Olympic gold medals in swimming, and set 50 world records in the sport, before turning to acting, where he became the sixth Tarzan. His iconic yell will forever be associated with the character.

46 Stephen Crane

Recognized primarily for his book, The Red Badge of Courage, Crane can barely be seen on the cover. He was a Realist novelist who died at the very young age of 28.

47 Issy Bonn

Issy Bonn was a Jewish vaudeville star who the Beatles would have heard on BBC Radio music shows.

48 George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw shaped modern theater and wrote over 60 plays. Critics note him as “second only to Shakespeare in the British theatrical tradition.” He was the first person to receive both a Nobel Prize ("for his work which is marked by both idealism and humanity, its stimulating satire often being infused with a singular poetic beauty”) and an Oscar (Pygmalion).

49 H.C. Westermann

Westermann was a sculptor that used his art as a scathing commentary on militarism and materialism after witnessing horrific violence and bloodshed in the US Marine Corps in both World War II and the Korean War.

50 Albert Stubbins

Stubbins is one of the few sports heroes on the album cover, having played centre forward on English football teams. He was also a Liverpool native.

51 Sri Lahiri Mahasaya

Indian yogi. (See #1)

52 Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll’s poem “The Walrus and the Carpenter” influenced John Lennon’s lyrics for “I Am The Walrus.” Lennon declared his love for Alice In Wonderland and Alice Through The Looking Glass, saying, “I usually read those two about once a year, because I still like them.”

53 T.E. Lawrence

Lawrence was a British archaeologist, military officer, diplomat, and writer who was immortalized in the 1962 film Lawrence Of Arabia, where he was played by Peter O’Toole. His best known written work is Seven Pillars of Wisdom, an autobiographical account of his participation in the Arab Revolt.

54 Sonny Liston

A wax figurine of Sonny Liston was used on the cover, as Liston was not a fan of the band. While in Miami in 1964, The Beatles wanted to meet Sonny Liston, but Liston wasn’t interested. He took one look at them and said, “I ain’t posing with them sissies.” Their music fared no better. Liston said, “My dog can play better drums than that kid with the big nose.” He lost his championship that year to newcomer Cassius Clay.

55 Petty Girl #2

See #38.

56 Wax Model of George Harrison

The models of John (#57), Paul (#60), George (#56) and Ringo (#59) in their early “Beatlemania” phase were borrowed from Madame Tussauds for the Sgt. Pepper photo shoot.

57 Wax Model of John Lennon

The models of John (#57), Paul (#60), George (#56) and Ringo (#59) in their early “Beatlemania” phase were borrowed from Madame Tussauds for the Sgt. Pepper photo shoot.

58 Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple was probably the biggest child star - ever - and was featured three times in the collage. Before agreeing to have her image on the cover, she requested to hear the album. Image #73 of her is a cloth doll of the star wearing a dress with the slogan “Welcome The Rolling Stones, Good Guys”.

59 Wax Model of Ringo Starr

The models of John (#57), Paul (#60), George (#56) and Ringo (#59) in their early “Beatlemania” phase were borrowed from Madame Tussauds for the Sgt. Pepper photo shoot.

60 Wax Model of Paul McCartney

The models of John (#57), Paul (#60), George (#56) and Ringo (#59) in their early “Beatlemania” phase were borrowed from Madame Tussauds for the Sgt. Pepper photo shoot.

61 Albert Einstein

You can barely see Einstein peaking out above Lennon’s right shoulder, but the famed physicist made the cut.

62 John Lennon

John (#62), Ringo (#63), Paul (#64) and George (#65) presented themselves as Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, resplendent in what would become some of the most iconic costumes ever. McCartney had rented a van load of instruments including French horns, tubas and trumpets. Producer George Martin said, “They wanted to have these very un-Beatle instruments in the photo. The only trouble is they didn’t know how to hold them.”

63 Ringo Starr

John (#62), Ringo (#63), Paul (#64) and George (#65) presented themselves as Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, resplendent in what would become some of the most iconic costumes ever. McCartney had rented a van load of instruments including French horns, tubas and trumpets. Producer George Martin said, “They wanted to have these very un-Beatle instruments in the photo. The only trouble is they didn’t know how to hold them.”

64 Paul McCartney

John (#62), Ringo (#63), Paul (#64) and George (#65) presented themselves as Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, resplendent in what would become some of the most iconic costumes ever. McCartney had rented a van load of instruments including French horns, tubas and trumpets. Producer George Martin said, “They wanted to have these very un-Beatle instruments in the photo. The only trouble is they didn’t know how to hold them.”

65 George Harrison

John (#62), Ringo (#63), Paul (#64) and George (#65) presented themselves as Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, resplendent in what would become some of the most iconic costumes ever. McCartney had rented a van load of instruments including French horns, tubas and trumpets. Producer George Martin said, “They wanted to have these very un-Beatle instruments in the photo. The only trouble is they didn’t know how to hold them.”

66 Bobby Breen

Bobby Breen was a child star in the 1930s and said to be the “most surprised” when he was informed of his inclusion on the album.

67 Marlene Dietrich

Marlene Dietrich was a high-profile actress who later mainly became a live cabaret performer. She met The Beatles in November 1963 at a Royal Variety Performance and was famously photographed with them.

68 Mahatma Gandhi

No, you don’t see Gandhi on the album cover as he was later painted out due to concerns that seeing his image on the cover would be offensive to the people of India. Gandhi was known for using nonviolent civil disobedience in his protests for civil rights. This is one of three people John Lennon had chosen that did not make the cover. The other two were Jesus Christ and Adolf Hitler.

69 Legionnaire from The Royal Antediluvian Order Of Buffaloes

Known as the Buffs, this is one of the UK’s largest fraternal organizations. Membership is open to all males over the age of 18 who are willing to declare that they are "true and loyal supporters of the British Crown and Constitution.” Their motto is "No Man Is At All Times Wise" and it has the maxim of "Justice, Truth and Philanthropy.”

70 Diana Dors

Dors was the UK’s answer to Marilyn Monroe. She initially starred mainly in risqué sex comedies, but later had a cabaret career and was a tabloid regular due to the “adult” parties at her home.

71 Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple was probably the biggest child star - ever - and was featured three times in the collage. Before agreeing to have her image on the cover, she requested to hear the album. Image #73 of her is a cloth doll of the star wearing a dress with the slogan “Welcome The Rolling Stones, Good Guys”.

72 Cloth grandmother figure

Sewn by Jann Haworth, who was co-creator of the Sgt Pepper album cover with her husband Peter Blake, this cloth grandmother doll was homemade. Haworth also came up with the idea of writing out the name of the band in civic flower-bed lettering as well.

73 Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple was probably the biggest child star - ever - and was featured three times in the collage. Before agreeing to have her image on the cover, she requested to hear the album. Image #73 of her is a cloth doll of the star wearing a dress with the slogan “Welcome The Rolling Stones, Good Guys”.

Related


Rolling Stones Voodoo Lounge Uncut
Advertisement

Send this to a friend